Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics of Working with Witnesses

$79.00

Preparing witnesses – whether fact witnesses or experts – for deposition or trial or conferring with them during breaks in testimony fraught with ethical issues. Expert witnesses are paid for their time, not their testimony. Though they may be hired to support a client’s view of the facts, there are limits to how experts can be coached. There are also real limits to how attorneys can prompt fact witnesses, for instance to “not remember” unfavorable facts. There are also significant ethical issues involving how to handle inadvertently produced privileged documents and when testimony goes in an unexpected adverse direction. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the ethical issues and traps of working with witnesses.   Paying witnesses for their time versus their testimony Prompting a witness to “not remember” unfavorable testimony Conferring with witnesses during deposition breaks and the limits of what you advise Dishonest witnesses – what are your obligations to the court and your client? How to handle the inadvertent production of privileged documents Drafting witness affidavits without interviewing the witness   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the Tysons Corners, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, where he advises firm clients on professional responsibility issues and properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  He has served on the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and is a Member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  He has written extensively on attorney-client privilege, ethics and other topics, and has spoken at over 1,800 CLE programs throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries.  Through links on his website biography, he has made available to the public his summaries of over 1,600 Virginia and ABA legal ethics opinions, organized by topic; a 300 page summary of his two-volume 1,500 page book on the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrine; over 900 weekly email alerts about privilege and work product cases; and materials for 40 ethics programs on numerous topics, totaling over 9,000 pages of analysis.  Mr. Spahn graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received his J.D. from Yale Law School. Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, her practice focused on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Rules of Professional Conduct Rules Review Committee.  She is the immediate past chair of the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/29/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics of Working with Witnesses

$79.00

Preparing witnesses – whether fact witnesses or experts – for deposition or trial or conferring with them during breaks in testimony fraught with ethical issues. Expert witnesses are paid for their time, not their testimony. Though they may be hired to support a client’s view of the facts, there are limits to how experts can be coached. There are also real limits to how attorneys can prompt fact witnesses, for instance to “not remember” unfavorable facts. There are also significant ethical issues involving how to handle inadvertently produced privileged documents and when testimony goes in an unexpected adverse direction. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the ethical issues and traps of working with witnesses.   Paying witnesses for their time versus their testimony Prompting a witness to “not remember” unfavorable testimony Conferring with witnesses during deposition breaks and the limits of what you advise Dishonest witnesses – what are your obligations to the court and your client? How to handle the inadvertent production of privileged documents Drafting witness affidavits without interviewing the witness   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the Tysons Corners, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, where he advises firm clients on professional responsibility issues and properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  He has served on the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and is a Member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  He has written extensively on attorney-client privilege, ethics and other topics, and has spoken at over 1,800 CLE programs throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries.  Through links on his website biography, he has made available to the public his summaries of over 1,600 Virginia and ABA legal ethics opinions, organized by topic; a 300 page summary of his two-volume 1,500 page book on the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrine; over 900 weekly email alerts about privilege and work product cases; and materials for 40 ethics programs on numerous topics, totaling over 9,000 pages of analysis.  Mr. Spahn graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received his J.D. from Yale Law School. Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, her practice focused on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Rules of Professional Conduct Rules Review Committee.  She is the immediate past chair of the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/29/2022
    Presented
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Course1

Buying, Selling and Exchanging Partnership and LLC Interests

$79.00

As LLCs have become the default choice of entity for most businesses, sales and exchanges of LLC membership interests are commonplace. Despite the frequency of sales and exchanges, exactly what rights of the seller the buyer succeeds to is often mistaken and these mistakes can lead to dispute and litigation. By default, transferees succeed only to the economic interests of the transferor. They do not succeed to the transferor’s governance rights. If governance rights are part of the underlying bargain, the consent of the LLC’s other members generally must be sought.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting and planning for the sale and exchange of LLC interests. Selling/exchanging LLC and partnership interests and effective alternatives Succession to economic rights of seller v. management and information rights Tax consequences to the entity and buyers/sellers in sales/exchanges of entity interests Disguised sales of LLC/partnership interests – and techniques to avoid adverse tax impact Constructive terminations and their adverse tax consequences Distributions and other alternative to sales and exchanges of LLC/partnership interests   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/30/2022
    Avail. Until
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Course1

Director and Officer Liability

$79.00

Statutory and common law impose certain fiduciary duties—care, diligence, good faith, and fair dealing—on directors and managers of corporate entities, managers of LLCs, and in certain instances members of LLCs. The corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines also operate to restrict the activity of closely held company stakeholders, preventing misappropriation of certain corporate or LLC opportunities. In certain instances, the owners of the entity may want to expand, limit, or even entirely eliminate these duties. Depending on the entity involved and the specific duty, the law may allow modification by agreement, but unintended consequences may be substantial. This program provides you with a practical guide to fiduciary duties in corporations and LLCs, how they may be modified, and the possible consequences.   • Fiduciary duties in closely held corporations and LLCs• Corporate fiduciary duties and standards of review—duty of loyalty and duty of care• Conflicts of interest and self-dealing issues in closely held corporations• Fiduciary duties in LLCs—standards set by contract and by law• Which duties may be modified or eliminated—and which may not• How the corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines work in closely held companies.   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where he advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions. He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the ABA Business Law Section Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee. He is also a Certified Public Accountant. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/30/2022
    Presented
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Course1

Director and Officer Liability

$79.00

Statutory and common law impose certain fiduciary duties—care, diligence, good faith, and fair dealing—on directors and managers of corporate entities, managers of LLCs, and in certain instances members of LLCs. The corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines also operate to restrict the activity of closely held company stakeholders, preventing misappropriation of certain corporate or LLC opportunities. In certain instances, the owners of the entity may want to expand, limit, or even entirely eliminate these duties. Depending on the entity involved and the specific duty, the law may allow modification by agreement, but unintended consequences may be substantial. This program provides you with a practical guide to fiduciary duties in corporations and LLCs, how they may be modified, and the possible consequences.   • Fiduciary duties in closely held corporations and LLCs• Corporate fiduciary duties and standards of review—duty of loyalty and duty of care• Conflicts of interest and self-dealing issues in closely held corporations• Fiduciary duties in LLCs—standards set by contract and by law• Which duties may be modified or eliminated—and which may not• How the corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines work in closely held companies.   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where he advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions. He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the ABA Business Law Section Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee. He is also a Certified Public Accountant. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/30/2022
    Presented
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Course1

Letters of Intent in Business Transactions

$79.00

Letters of intent frame the material terms of business and commercial transactions.  They outline with considerable detail the substantive terms of the underlying agreement – price, reps and warranties, closing conditions, etc. They also provide a process by which a definitive underlying agreement will be finalized. But they are not, generally, intended to be definitive agreements themselves; not enforceable, only a substantial starting point. There is, however, a certain point at which the detail in these letters becomes so extensive that they become enforceable.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the most important substantive and process aspects of letters of intent, their uses and traps, including unexpected enforceability. Drafting effective letters of intent in transactions Purposes of letters, timing, relationship to diligence, exclusivity Substantive  terms v. process terms Indemnity, hold back and limitation of liability provisions Termination of a letter and survival of certain provisions Understanding the point at which letters of intent may become enforceable   Speaker: Stephanie Molyneaux is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she assists clients with a wide variety of transactional matters.  Her experience includes mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, contractual agreements, technology transactions, licensing, and intellectual property transactions.  Ms. Molyneaux received her B.A., with distinction, from American University of Beirut and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/3/2022
    Avail. Until
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics When Working with Paralegals

$79.00

Paralegals are often essential for lawyers to successfully practice law.  Paralegals conduct basic legal research, help review and prepare documents, and sometimes screen clients.  Still, they are not lawyers and not directly subject to the ethics rules applicable to lawyers. But the lawyers who supervise their work are responsible for their actions and liable for any improper conduct.  Lawyers are responsible for ensuring that their paralegals’ work conforms to ethics rules. If a paralegal’s actions breach client confidentiality, compromise the attorney-client privilege, or are otherwise improper, the supervising lawyer is ethically responsible for that misconduct.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to how ethics rules make supervising lawyers responsible for the actions of their paralegals.    Conflicts of interest and the attribution of paralegal knowledge about client matters Determining when paralegal research and document preparation becomes the unauthorized practice of law How paralegals must be instructed about client confidentiality – and lawyer consequences on breach Attorney-client privilege implications when clients communicate with paralegals – and risk of inadvertent disclosure Issues when paralegals participate in discovery Fee sharing with paralegals   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the Tysons Corners, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, where he advises firm clients on professional responsibility issues and properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  He has served on the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility, and is a Member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  He has written extensively on attorney-client privilege, ethics and other topics, and has spoken at over 1,800 CLE programs throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries.  Through links on his website biography, he has made available to the public  his summaries of over 1,600 Virginia and ABA legal ethics opinions, organized by topic; a 300 page summary of his two-volume 1,500 page book on the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrine; over 900 weekly email alerts about privilege and work product cases; and materials for 40 ethics programs on numerous topics, totaling over 9,000 pages of analysis.  Mr. Spahn graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/3/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics When Working with Paralegals

$79.00

Paralegals are often essential for lawyers to successfully practice law.  Paralegals conduct basic legal research, help review and prepare documents, and sometimes screen clients.  Still, they are not lawyers and not directly subject to the ethics rules applicable to lawyers. But the lawyers who supervise their work are responsible for their actions and liable for any improper conduct.  Lawyers are responsible for ensuring that their paralegals’ work conforms to ethics rules. If a paralegal’s actions breach client confidentiality, compromise the attorney-client privilege, or are otherwise improper, the supervising lawyer is ethically responsible for that misconduct.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to how ethics rules make supervising lawyers responsible for the actions of their paralegals.    Conflicts of interest and the attribution of paralegal knowledge about client matters Determining when paralegal research and document preparation becomes the unauthorized practice of law How paralegals must be instructed about client confidentiality – and lawyer consequences on breach Attorney-client privilege implications when clients communicate with paralegals – and risk of inadvertent disclosure Issues when paralegals participate in discovery Fee sharing with paralegals   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the Tysons Corners, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, where he advises firm clients on professional responsibility issues and properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  He has served on the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility, and is a Member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  He has written extensively on attorney-client privilege, ethics and other topics, and has spoken at over 1,800 CLE programs throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries.  Through links on his website biography, he has made available to the public  his summaries of over 1,600 Virginia and ABA legal ethics opinions, organized by topic; a 300 page summary of his two-volume 1,500 page book on the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrine; over 900 weekly email alerts about privilege and work product cases; and materials for 40 ethics programs on numerous topics, totaling over 9,000 pages of analysis.  Mr. Spahn graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/3/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 1

$79.00

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions.   Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs   Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/4/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 1

$79.00

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions.   Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs   Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/4/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 2

$79.00

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions.   Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs   Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/5/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 2

$79.00

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions.   Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs   Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/5/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Family Businesses, Part 1

$79.00

  Most successful businesses are owned by one or more families.  Because they are family owned, these companies create many special planning challenges.  Ownership and control do not shift among non-owner managers. Rather, succession in ownership and management is a momentous and often highly emotional process for members of the family.  Frequently, these transitions are caused by the retirement or death of members of a family member.  And these transitions, if not carefully planned and delicately handled, can be ruinous, damaging the family and their company.  This program will provide you a practical framework of trust and estate planning and succession planning for family businesses.    Day 1: Succession planning in family businesses Counseling clients on how to avoid family drama on succession Valuation issues for financial and tax purposes Buy-sell planning with family members or key employees Selling to third parties where intra-family succession is not possible Planning for the incapacity of the founding generation   Day 2: Life insurance trust planning – or as a compensating asset to certain heirs Structuring private annuities to transfer a business and provide income to founders Self-cancelling installments notes and intentionally defective irrevocable trusts Use of GRATS and “redemptive freezes”   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/6/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Family Businesses, Part 1

$79.00

  Most successful businesses are owned by one or more families.  Because they are family owned, these companies create many special planning challenges.  Ownership and control do not shift among non-owner managers. Rather, succession in ownership and management is a momentous and often highly emotional process for members of the family.  Frequently, these transitions are caused by the retirement or death of members of a family member.  And these transitions, if not carefully planned and delicately handled, can be ruinous, damaging the family and their company.  This program will provide you a practical framework of trust and estate planning and succession planning for family businesses.    Day 1: Succession planning in family businesses Counseling clients on how to avoid family drama on succession Valuation issues for financial and tax purposes Buy-sell planning with family members or key employees Selling to third parties where intra-family succession is not possible Planning for the incapacity of the founding generation   Day 2: Life insurance trust planning – or as a compensating asset to certain heirs Structuring private annuities to transfer a business and provide income to founders Self-cancelling installments notes and intentionally defective irrevocable trusts Use of GRATS and “redemptive freezes”   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/6/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Family Businesses, Part 2

$79.00

Most successful businesses are owned by one or more families.  Because they are family owned, these companies create many special planning challenges.  Ownership and control do not shift among non-owner managers. Rather, succession in ownership and management is a momentous and often highly emotional process for members of the family.  Frequently, these transitions are caused by the retirement or death of members of a family member.  And these transitions, if not carefully planned and delicately handled, can be ruinous, damaging the family and their company.  This program will provide you a practical framework of trust and estate planning and succession planning for family businesses.    Day 1: Succession planning in family businesses Counseling clients on how to avoid family drama on succession Valuation issues for financial and tax purposes Buy-sell planning with family members or key employees Selling to third parties where intra-family succession is not possible Planning for the incapacity of the founding generation   Day 2: Life insurance trust planning – or as a compensating asset to certain heirs Structuring private annuities to transfer a business and provide income to founders Self-cancelling installments notes and intentionally defective irrevocable trusts Use of GRATS and “redemptive freezes”   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/7/2022
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Family Businesses, Part 2

$79.00

Most successful businesses are owned by one or more families.  Because they are family owned, these companies create many special planning challenges.  Ownership and control do not shift among non-owner managers. Rather, succession in ownership and management is a momentous and often highly emotional process for members of the family.  Frequently, these transitions are caused by the retirement or death of members of a family member.  And these transitions, if not carefully planned and delicately handled, can be ruinous, damaging the family and their company.  This program will provide you a practical framework of trust and estate planning and succession planning for family businesses.    Day 1: Succession planning in family businesses Counseling clients on how to avoid family drama on succession Valuation issues for financial and tax purposes Buy-sell planning with family members or key employees Selling to third parties where intra-family succession is not possible Planning for the incapacity of the founding generation   Day 2: Life insurance trust planning – or as a compensating asset to certain heirs Structuring private annuities to transfer a business and provide income to founders Self-cancelling installments notes and intentionally defective irrevocable trusts Use of GRATS and “redemptive freezes”   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/7/2022
    Presented
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The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 1

$79.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/7/2022
    Avail. Until
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The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 2

$79.00

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies.   Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/8/2022
    Avail. Until
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Employment Law Torts

$79.00

The workplace is deep with potential torts.  Hiring can be a delicate balance of adequately investigating the background of an applicant without making legally prohibited searches or inquiries.  Workplace supervision in a technologically interconnected age can easily give rise to claims of invasions of privacy. Workplace investigations, often involving conflicts among employees, can implicate claims of basis, discrimination, harassment, intentional infliction of emotional distress, defamation, and retaliation.  At every stage of the employment process there are potential torts.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to employer tort liability in the workplace.  Torts in hiring –balancing act of background checks, drug/cannabis checks, and the standard of foreseeability Privacy based torts – monitoring employee social media and other digital communications/posts Negligent retention of potentially dangerous employees Torts in workplace investigations – intentional infliction of emotional distress, defamation, false light torts Negligent supervision of troubled employees Best practices and defenses for employers to avoid or limit liability   Speaker: Alex J. Maturi is an attorney in the Chicago office of Paul Hastings, LLP, where he represents employers in all aspects of employment law, including discrimination, harassment, wrongful discharge, and wage and hour matters. He also counsels clients on compliance with state and federal law, and advises employers facing investigations initiated by the EEOC, OFCCP, and various state agencies.  During law school, he served as an extern judicial clerk to Judge Robert W. Gettleman of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Mr. Maturi earned his B.A., cum laude, Illinois Wesleyan University and his J.D., cum laude, from Northwestern University School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/9/2022
    Avail. Until
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Ethics in Trust and Estate Practice

$79.00

Trust and estate practice often sits at the intersection of money, aging clients, family drama, easy accusations of self-dealing and misdeeds, dispute – and anger.  This turbulent combination of circumstances can put attorneys in difficult ethical spots. Questions about the competence of aging clients in combination with family drama can easily lead to ethical complaints and eventually litigation. There are also issues of decision-making authority and confidentiality if someone other than the client is paying for the representation.  Conflicts of interest, especially where a longtime client may gift something to the attorney, are rife. This program will provide you with a practical guide to substantial ethical issues in trust and estate practice. Working with clients with diminished capacity and protecting against challenges Confidentiality – understanding what information is confidential and when and to whom it can be disclosed Conflicts of interest – joint and common representations, husbands and wives, multiple generations of a family Gifts from clients – what lawyers may accept, what should they decline? Special issues when someone other than the client pays for a representation   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/10/2022
    Avail. Until
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LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics in Real Estate Practice

$79.00

  The real estate industry is fiercely competitive as developers and contractors, investors and lenders, brokers and others – often with the aid of legal counsel – seek advantage. This can easily present real estate lawyers with ethical dilemmas. Conflicts of interest are rife. There are issues of communicating and negotiating with unrepresented parties. There are also issues of taking an equity stake in a real estate venture in lieu of fees.  Sometimes, too, there is the discovery that a client is engaged in wrongdoing. These and many other ethical issues arise in real estate practice.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to common ethics issues in real estate practice.   Joint representations of a business entity and its owners in a real estate transaction Representation of a client with adverse interests in unrelated transactions Exchange of legal services for transaction equity Communications with unrepresented parties – and with represented parties Inadvertent disclosure of confidential Transaction terms Special issues when client wrongdoing is discovered   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com <http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/10/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics in Real Estate Practice

$79.00

  The real estate industry is fiercely competitive as developers and contractors, investors and lenders, brokers and others – often with the aid of legal counsel – seek advantage. This can easily present real estate lawyers with ethical dilemmas. Conflicts of interest are rife. There are issues of communicating and negotiating with unrepresented parties. There are also issues of taking an equity stake in a real estate venture in lieu of fees.  Sometimes, too, there is the discovery that a client is engaged in wrongdoing. These and many other ethical issues arise in real estate practice.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to common ethics issues in real estate practice.   Joint representations of a business entity and its owners in a real estate transaction Representation of a client with adverse interests in unrelated transactions Exchange of legal services for transaction equity Communications with unrepresented parties – and with represented parties Inadvertent disclosure of confidential Transaction terms Special issues when client wrongdoing is discovered   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com <http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/10/2022
    Presented
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Course1

Income and Fiduciary Tax Issues for Trust and Estate Planners, Part 1

$79.00

Understanding fiduciary income taxation – the taxation of grantor and non-grantor trusts, complex and simple trusts – is essential to trust planning.  It impacts the type of trust chosen, how it’s structured and administered.  Recently changes to federal tax law have added to the complexity of fiduciary income taxation.  The tax treatment of trust income and accounting for distributions and expenses varies depending on the type of trust involved and how “Distributable Net Income” is allocated.This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the essential rules, timeframes, planning techniques and traps of the taxation of trusts.   Day 1: Fiduciary income taxation framework and rules for estate and trust planners How fiduciary and income tax planning differ from each other Planning for fiduciary taxation v. planning for individual and corporate tax purposes Types of trusts – simple, complex, grantor – and differing tax rules for each Treatment of “Distributable Net Income” Understanding “Trust Accounting Income,” and impact of Prudent Investor Rule   Day 2: Practical income allocation for simple, complex and grantor trusts Specific allocation rules for DNI – Tier System, Separate Share Rule, 65 Day Rule, specific bequests Charitable giving – tax treatment and practical impact Treatment of depreciation, administrative expenses, and allocation to income Trust terminations – capital loss carryover and excess deductions   Speaker: Jeremiah W. Doyle, IV is senior vice president in the Boston office of BNY Mellon Wealth Management, where he provides integrated wealth management advice to high net worth individuals on holding, managing and transferring wealth in a tax-efficient manner.  He is the editor and co-author of “Preparing Fiduciary Income Tax Returns,” a contributing author of Preparing Estate Tax Returns,and a contributing author of “Understanding and Using Trusts,” all published by Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education.  Mr. Doyle received his B.S. from Providence College, his J.D. form Hamline University Law School, and his LL.M. in banking from Boston University Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/11/2022
    Presented
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Course1

Income and Fiduciary Tax Issues for Trust and Estate Planners, Part 1

$79.00

Understanding fiduciary income taxation – the taxation of grantor and non-grantor trusts, complex and simple trusts – is essential to trust planning.  It impacts the type of trust chosen, how it’s structured and administered.  Recently changes to federal tax law have added to the complexity of fiduciary income taxation.  The tax treatment of trust income and accounting for distributions and expenses varies depending on the type of trust involved and how “Distributable Net Income” is allocated.This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the essential rules, timeframes, planning techniques and traps of the taxation of trusts.   Day 1: Fiduciary income taxation framework and rules for estate and trust planners How fiduciary and income tax planning differ from each other Planning for fiduciary taxation v. planning for individual and corporate tax purposes Types of trusts – simple, complex, grantor – and differing tax rules for each Treatment of “Distributable Net Income” Understanding “Trust Accounting Income,” and impact of Prudent Investor Rule   Day 2: Practical income allocation for simple, complex and grantor trusts Specific allocation rules for DNI – Tier System, Separate Share Rule, 65 Day Rule, specific bequests Charitable giving – tax treatment and practical impact Treatment of depreciation, administrative expenses, and allocation to income Trust terminations – capital loss carryover and excess deductions   Speaker: Jeremiah W. Doyle, IV is senior vice president in the Boston office of BNY Mellon Wealth Management, where he provides integrated wealth management advice to high net worth individuals on holding, managing and transferring wealth in a tax-efficient manner.  He is the editor and co-author of “Preparing Fiduciary Income Tax Returns,” a contributing author of Preparing Estate Tax Returns,and a contributing author of “Understanding and Using Trusts,” all published by Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education.  Mr. Doyle received his B.S. from Providence College, his J.D. form Hamline University Law School, and his LL.M. in banking from Boston University Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/11/2022
    Presented
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Course1

Income and Fiduciary Tax Issues for Trust and Estate Planners, Part 2

$79.00

Understanding fiduciary income taxation – the taxation of grantor and non-grantor trusts, complex and simple trusts – is essential to trust planning.  It impacts the type of trust chosen, how it’s structured and administered.  Recently changes to federal tax law have added to the complexity of fiduciary income taxation.  The tax treatment of trust income and accounting for distributions and expenses varies depending on the type of trust involved and how “Distributable Net Income” is allocated.This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the essential rules, timeframes, planning techniques and traps of the taxation of trusts.   Day 1: Fiduciary income taxation framework and rules for estate and trust planners How fiduciary and income tax planning differ from each other Planning for fiduciary taxation v. planning for individual and corporate tax purposes Types of trusts – simple, complex, grantor – and differing tax rules for each Treatment of “Distributable Net Income” Understanding “Trust Accounting Income,” and impact of Prudent Investor Rule   Day 2: Practical income allocation for simple, complex and grantor trusts Specific allocation rules for DNI – Tier System, Separate Share Rule, 65 Day Rule, specific bequests Charitable giving – tax treatment and practical impact Treatment of depreciation, administrative expenses, and allocation to income Trust terminations – capital loss carryover and excess deductions   Speaker: Jeremiah W. Doyle, IV is senior vice president in the Boston office of BNY Mellon Wealth Management, where he provides integrated wealth management advice to high net worth individuals on holding, managing and transferring wealth in a tax-efficient manner.  He is the editor and co-author of “Preparing Fiduciary Income Tax Returns,” a contributing author of Preparing Estate Tax Returns,and a contributing author of “Understanding and Using Trusts,” all published by Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education.  Mr. Doyle received his B.S. from Providence College, his J.D. form Hamline University Law School, and his LL.M. in banking from Boston University Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/12/2022
    Presented
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Course1

Income and Fiduciary Tax Issues for Trust and Estate Planners, Part 2

$79.00

Understanding fiduciary income taxation – the taxation of grantor and non-grantor trusts, complex and simple trusts – is essential to trust planning.  It impacts the type of trust chosen, how it’s structured and administered.  Recently changes to federal tax law have added to the complexity of fiduciary income taxation.  The tax treatment of trust income and accounting for distributions and expenses varies depending on the type of trust involved and how “Distributable Net Income” is allocated.This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the essential rules, timeframes, planning techniques and traps of the taxation of trusts.   Day 1: Fiduciary income taxation framework and rules for estate and trust planners How fiduciary and income tax planning differ from each other Planning for fiduciary taxation v. planning for individual and corporate tax purposes Types of trusts – simple, complex, grantor – and differing tax rules for each Treatment of “Distributable Net Income” Understanding “Trust Accounting Income,” and impact of Prudent Investor Rule   Day 2: Practical income allocation for simple, complex and grantor trusts Specific allocation rules for DNI – Tier System, Separate Share Rule, 65 Day Rule, specific bequests Charitable giving – tax treatment and practical impact Treatment of depreciation, administrative expenses, and allocation to income Trust terminations – capital loss carryover and excess deductions   Speaker: Jeremiah W. Doyle, IV is senior vice president in the Boston office of BNY Mellon Wealth Management, where he provides integrated wealth management advice to high net worth individuals on holding, managing and transferring wealth in a tax-efficient manner.  He is the editor and co-author of “Preparing Fiduciary Income Tax Returns,” a contributing author of Preparing Estate Tax Returns,and a contributing author of “Understanding and Using Trusts,” all published by Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education.  Mr. Doyle received his B.S. from Providence College, his J.D. form Hamline University Law School, and his LL.M. in banking from Boston University Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/12/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 1

$79.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/13/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 1

$79.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/13/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 2

$79.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/14/2022
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 2

$79.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/14/2022
    Presented
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